Close
All Categories
    Search
    Filters
    Preferences

    BioHaze™ in the Brewhouse

    BioHaze™ is a new haze stabilizer from Kerry Bioscience. Produced from all-natural materials, BioHaze™ acts by binding with protein molecules in beer to form polyphenol-protein complexes. These complexes create a stable haze that maximizes the visual appeal of juicy and hazy IPA, as well as other naturally cloudy styles. 

    The research team at the Rahr Technical Center conducted a trial on the effect of dry hopping in conjunction with the use of BioHaze™. In the trial, a base beer (a honey wheat ale which had undergone filtration) was split. Half was racked to a 5 gallon keg and dry-hopped with 90 grams of Wai-iti™hops (~1.2 lb/bbl). 

    The dry-hopped portion was then halved again into two 2.5 gallon kegs, with one dosed at 500 ppm BioHaze™ (low dose), and the other dosed at 1000 ppm BioHaze™ (high dose). 

    The control half of the beer was not dry-hopped, and was also split into two 2.5 gallon kegs and dosed with BioHaze™ at the same low-dose and high-dose rates.

    The haze resulting from each dose was measured over time using a turbidimeter:

     

    Days

    No Dry-Hop, Low Dose

    No Dry-Hop, High Dose

    Dry-Hop, Low Dose

    Dry Hop, High Dose

    0

    >99.9

    >>99.9

    >>99.0

    >>99.9

    7

    19.7

    22

    >99.9

    >>99.9

    14

    5.9

    22.1

    67.4

    >99.9

    22

    5.8

    15.5

    63.1

    78.7

    29

    5.5

    20.5

    43.9

    >99.9

    The turbidimeter is calibrated up to 99.9 NTU - some of the initial readings were far beyond this value. (see photo at the top for visual examples of  >99 NTU)

     

     

     

    The RTC’s Juan Medina concluded: 

    The key takeaway from this experiment is that the BioHaze™ performed best in conjunction with a dry hop addition. Based on this beer, it would seem that the higher dosing rate for BioHaze™ is most effective, but it is important to note that this may not be true with all beers and hopping rates. Brewers would be well-advised to experiment with different dosing rates based on their beers.